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Mango Galette

Mango+Galette+1

Remember the case of Ataulfo mangos I picked up ridiculously close to the day we left town for Tofino? They came with us, and were kind enough to ripen two or three at a time, so we’ve been eating them steadily all week. In salads, on oatmeal, on French toast, and straight up. But we’re down to our last few, and it occurred to me they’d make a mighty fine pie, in a peachy sort of way – full of flavour and not overly juicy, they didn’t require anything in the way of thickener. Nothing to make them stodgy – just fruit, the merest skiff of sugar, and crust.

Being without a pie plate turned out to be a good thing – it reminded me how ridiculouly simple free-form tarts are. (The fancy name for these is a galette.) All it requires of the cook is for him/her to roll out pastry dough into a rough circle, slide it onto a baking sheet, pile (or daintily arrange) sliced fruit or berries overtop, haphazardly fold the edges of the pastry over to contain said fruit, and bake. If you want to get fancy, you could brush the edges of the pastry with beaten egg and sprinkle it with sugar, or brush the fruit with warmed jelly. I did neither. I used a wine bottle to roll the pastry, and it was the easiest pie ever. It is the epitome of rustic – whomever first applied that word to food should win a nobel prize – you can be full-on sloppy with the rolling and the folding and it almost looks better for it.

The next morning we all nibbled on thin slices of it with our coffee; paired with the view, it was the best breakfast ever. (It might even be without the view – like the best kind of breakfast pastry, without the sweetness.)

Use any pastry recipe here. I tried one that has a particularly high ratio of butter to flour, making it sandy and shortbreadlike in texture.

Mango Galette

AuthorJulie

2-3 ripe mangos, peeled and sliced
sugar, to taste
Pastry
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 tsp. salt
3/4 cup cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces
3 Tbsp. (ish) ice water

1

In a bowl or the bowl of a food processor, stir together the flour and salt; add the butter and blend with a fork or pastry cutter (or pulse with the food processor) until the mixture is crumbly, with pieces no bigger than a pea. (You don't want the butter to be completely blended; some should be, with some pieces left bigger.) Add the ice water and stir just until the dough comes together, adding a little more of the dough is dry. Gather into a ball, flatten into a disk, wrap in plastic and refrigerate for an hour or overnight.

2

Preheat oven to 375°F. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to about a 14" circle (it doesn't need to be perfect) and slide it onto a baking sheet. Place the mango in concentric circles on the dough, leaving a 1"-2" border around the edge. Sprinkle the fruit with sugar (to taste - depending on how sweet your mangoes are) and fold the edges of the crust over the fruit, letting it fold wherever it wants to. If you like, brush the crust with a little beaten egg and sprinkle with more sugar - coarse, if you have it.

3

Bake for about 45 minutes, until golden. Let stand at least 10 minutes before serving; cut into wedges and serve warm or at room temperature.

Category,

Ingredients

 2-3 ripe mangos, peeled and sliced
 sugar, to taste
Pastry
 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
 1/4 tsp. salt
 3/4 cup cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces
 3 Tbsp. (ish) ice water

Directions

1

In a bowl or the bowl of a food processor, stir together the flour and salt; add the butter and blend with a fork or pastry cutter (or pulse with the food processor) until the mixture is crumbly, with pieces no bigger than a pea. (You don't want the butter to be completely blended; some should be, with some pieces left bigger.) Add the ice water and stir just until the dough comes together, adding a little more of the dough is dry. Gather into a ball, flatten into a disk, wrap in plastic and refrigerate for an hour or overnight.

2

Preheat oven to 375°F. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to about a 14" circle (it doesn't need to be perfect) and slide it onto a baking sheet. Place the mango in concentric circles on the dough, leaving a 1"-2" border around the edge. Sprinkle the fruit with sugar (to taste - depending on how sweet your mangoes are) and fold the edges of the crust over the fruit, letting it fold wherever it wants to. If you like, brush the crust with a little beaten egg and sprinkle with more sugar - coarse, if you have it.

3

Bake for about 45 minutes, until golden. Let stand at least 10 minutes before serving; cut into wedges and serve warm or at room temperature.

Mango Galette
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13 comments on “Mango Galette

  1. Jennifer Jo
    April 11, 2010 at 4:32 am

    I wish I would’ve thought of this back when we lived in Nicaragua with a row of giant mango trees sheltering our adobe house.

  2. Carol SB
    April 11, 2010 at 8:04 am

    Oh, wow.
    Thanks for bringing us along on your Tofino holiday, Julie.
    I’ve been enjoying every minute of it.
    -CSB

  3. Katherine
    April 11, 2010 at 4:38 pm

    What an amazing recipe! You’re so knowledgeable about the culinary process!

  4. Jan (Family Bites)
    April 11, 2010 at 8:28 pm

    I think this recipe could almost make me really like mangos (I only somewhat like them now)!

  5. barbara
    April 11, 2010 at 11:25 pm

    Mango season is over here but I’ll try this next season. I love mango.

  6. Cherine
    April 12, 2010 at 6:36 am

    This looks so good!

  7. Kristen
    April 12, 2010 at 10:59 am

    Would you believe I’ve never tried making a Galette? I always go the pie route. This summer, it is going to be all about the Galette around here 🙂

  8. Barb
    April 12, 2010 at 1:25 pm

    Mmmm Looks very yummy.

  9. Erica B.
    April 12, 2010 at 9:18 pm

    That galette of yours looks like summer. Thanks for sharing Julie.

  10. Amy @ Simply Sugar & Gluten Free
    April 13, 2010 at 6:33 pm

    I love the way you just whip up dishes day after day. It never ceases to amaze me. This looks delicious – I’ve made galettes before – it’s so much fun to go free-form without a pie pan to fill.

  11. Ashley
    April 19, 2010 at 6:28 pm

    OMG! I just made the mango galette and I am IN LOVE! It was the easiest and most delicious dessert I have ever made. I did brush the pastry with the egg wash and sprinkled some raw sugar on top and the entire thing was polished off the same night. I may have gone back for seconds… Tonight, we have fresh strawberries and I am going to make another galette. I am hooked I tell ya!

  12. annette
    April 28, 2011 at 12:43 pm

    I make galettes all the time with all kinds of fruit but my husband is crazy about the mango option. Here in Honduras we have mangoes by the truck full now. Note to people who do not like mangoes, there are people who are allergic could be your body warning you off the fruit.

  13. click here
    October 26, 2018 at 11:53 pm

    Wow, I am in awe of this syrup. I just paired it with fluffy buttermilk pancakes and spiced apples (which I sautéed with butter, cinnamon, and a little lemon juice), and I have to say, it was one of the most incredible things I’ve ever eaten. It’s so simple, but incredibly delicious. With the apples, it tasted almost like a dessert, but more buttery than sweet. I love it! Keep the recipes coming!

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