Well, hello. Does this not scream come jump into bed with me in a completely unsexual but rather cozy Grandma’s cottage or quaint B&B on a long weekend sort of way? I’ve wanted to make something with cornmeal and berries all summer, and the stray cob of corn on my countertop seemed as good an excuse as any… my sister’s raspberry bush had just been harvested, so it’s a little stingy in the berry dept. But the real kernels of corn, scraped off the cob, make up for it. It would do just as well with blueberries or blackberries, I think. One Year Ago: Bacon and Tomato Sandwich At the Family Kitchen: Lower-fat Double Chocolate Chip Cookies

0
Share
, ,

Have I shown off my garden yet? I’m loaded – with spinach and chard, that is – between the CSA box and the boxes in my back yard, I should have X-ray vision or some such superpower by the end of the summer. Which is coming up all too quickly. I punched “chard” into the search box on Epicurious the other day, looking for more inspiration (but really just procrastinating), and these frittata bites jumped out – they suggest cold squares for a cocktail party. I wound up doing my own thing, but kept the sausage-chard-feta combo, and it was loved by all. (Except W, who struggled unsuccessfully to separate the green stuff from the rest.) Bonus: two huge bunches of chard went into this – it always amazes me how small it gets once it wilts. You could cook a bunch down to a spoonful and just eat it, like a real-food vitamin pill. One Year Ago: Browned-Butter Blueberry Muffins (made with saskatoons)

0
Share
,

Dilemma: what does one make when asked to attend a potluck picnic for two dozen or so local food bloggers, all of whom will presumably go home to their computers to document the eats of the day? Rather than debate what might be most easily transportable, crowd-pleasing, visually stunning or dinner-party impressive (baked Alaska? too melty. Crêpes Suzette? too French) I figured I’d use some of the dandy purple, pink and white thin-skinned spuds I’m starting to have more of than I can use, and the pale green and yellow beans that came in our CSA box this week. Of course I’m still hopelessly hooked on that garlic scape pesto. And I wanted everyone at said picnic to have garlic breath as distinct (emphasis on stinct) as I. The potato salad was easy – I won’t complicate things by writing out a recipe. (Also? I’m lazy.) I boiled (I usually roast, but wanted the potatoes to suck up all that garlicky pesto) thin-skinned white andContinue reading

0
Share

It’s one of those things you come across and can’t rightly not make. It’s also the sort of thing a kitchenookful of 5-7 year old boys might prompt you to make early on a Saturday morning. They’re my excuse. Considering the ratio of flour to oil it makes sense that these would be insanely great. (But I use canola oil, which is the lowest in saturated fat and mostly heart-healthy mono and polyunsaturated fat, with omega 3s, even.) I did knock it down to 1/4 cup, which doesn’t seem like a big deal, but that one-and-a-third tablespoons of oil is about 160 calories and 18 grams of fat, so why not? They were still pretty great. And I love that I don’t have to separate the eggs and beat the whites. Who has the gumption for that first thing in the morning?

0
Share
,

This was actually dinner last night. Tonight W had his two cousins over for their first! sleepover! ever! And I doubt a vegetable curry would have gone over well. They played trains, and Mouse Trap, and played with bubble wrap, and we biked to the store for a movie and then went to the ice cream shop for some MacKays. We had pillow fights and popcorn, and grilled a plain old steak, straight-up, for dinner with new potatoes, carrots and peas from the CSA box. Sounds downright wholesome, don’t it? For those of you who don’t know what I’m talking about when I refer to my CSA box, I’d love to tell you about it – I’m hoping that soon CSA will be as common a household term as Costco or superstore. CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture – it’s a great arrangement that allows consumers (eaters) to connect more directly with (and more directly support) the source of their food. In a CSA relationship,Continue reading

0
Share
,

Can you take another pie? I remember my parents explaining to me why Christmas wouldn’t be special anymore if it came every day – it would just turn into the ordinary, into routine, and eventually we’d begin looking forward to something else. It seems this theory doesn’t apply to freshly baked pies. Especially when they arrive every day with ice cream. It was Emily’s last day before heading back to school (her school has a modified schedule) and she wanted to spend her last afternoon making pie. (Not to suggest that baking a pie would take all afternoon – we did it during the 6 o’clock news.) E is a soccer star, and her season ended (at the provincials last weekend – yay E!), and there is now a month and a half before her indoor season begins. She decided to devote some of that time to baking. And making ice cream. Looks like I’d better take up jogging. I let her choose what kind,Continue reading

0
Share
,

Today was brought to you by the letter P: Peaches and Pie and Pierre. I Prepared a Pretty Perfect Pie this morning. We were talking about pastry, and not five minutes after deciding on a topic yesterday I received a brand-new cookbook, one that instantly took a place of honour beside my bed (yes, this is why we only have one child). The Harrow Fair Cookbook was inspired by the annual agricultural fair in Harrow, Ontario that began in 1854. In this book are recipes for everything from blue-ribbon pies to farmstand salads, fritters, ice cream, fried chicken and preserves. It’s so directly up my alley. The authors, sisters Moira Sanders and Lori Elstone, wrote the book because they have such fond memories of attending the Harrow Fair as children. Their book is based on the principle that what we eat today should be as natural as it was 156 years ago, when the fair was established. If it includes pies like this first-place-ribbon-winning-peaches-and-cream beauty,Continue reading

0
Share

I’ve just brushed my teeth for ten full minutes and still have garlic scape burps. Since it’s still early in the season, we’ve been getting garlic scapes in our CSA box. The question is, what is a garlic scape and what does one do with them? When you think of garlic, you most likely picture an entire bulb, or head, but as it grows, the stalk is referred to as the garlic scape. They are long and green, windy and perfectly smooth, reminiscent of green onions or garlic chives with a not-so-subtle garlic flavour. You can chop them and add them to soups, stir-fries, salads.. or you could make a batch of garlicky pesto. Over the weekend we’ll be dipping into this for pasta, mashed potatoes.. maybe a pasta or potato salad? Minestrone? I pulled a pork loin from the freezer and roasted it with quartered potatoes, all drizzled with a bit of canola oil and sprinkled with salt and pepper. Both were fab withContinue reading

0
Share