Food + mountains = a fantastic combo, especially when it’s 23 degrees in the middle of the Rockies on a Friday afternoon-evening the first week of April. It’s perfect road trip weather, and patio weather, and sitting at a long table with 149 potential new friends under a tent while the sun sets behind the mountains weather. Canmore is a great food destination – Crazyweed has long been our stop of choice, and the new PD3 by Blake provides an awesomely unique dining experience on the upper level of a silver double decker bus.

3
Share

I’m all about the road trips. (Often, it’s just an excuse to buy Cheetos and gaze out the window.) Some weekends, they’re just short hops – and that’s fine, almost better than long hauls. It feels like there’s proper separation between you and the obligations of home, you still get to sleep in a hotel room bed, and there’s barely time for passengers to ask if we’re there yet. Also – I never get tired of the diversity of our prairie landscape. Drive in one direction (west) and you hit the Rockies. Drive in another (northeast) and after an hour or so of rolling fields, it suddenly opens up to this. Badlands! It’s different in winter, with a skiff of snow instead of almost intolerable heat, no hum of crickets nor risk of tripping over a rattlesnake. And no crowds at the Royal Tyrrell Museum, Canada’s only museum dedicated exclusively to the science of palaeontology, which W is now fully and completely preoccupied with. AlthoughContinue reading

3
Share

Despite how things might sound, we don’t get out a whole lot, just Mike and I. Partly because of life and stuff, and being the parents of a 10 year old who would rather go to McDonald’s – but also because my job involves a whole lot of cooking. So lately we’ve been making an attempt to get out more, investigate new places and taste new things, and at the same time support our (currently stressed-out) independent restaurants. Of course eating out can be pricey, so as believers in both love and money we’ve been seeking out ways to try new spots without spending too much. Here’s how we’ve been attempting to maintain a manageable Visa bill. They’ve been popping up around the city, offering great deals to bring people in before the dinner rush – we used to go to Cibo all the time after school (they have $5 pizzas weekdays between 3-5) but recently stumbled onto happy hour at Native Tongues, the new(ish)Continue reading

7
Share

Alberta is a province of beer lovers, but although we grow some of the best barley in the world, until fairly recently capacity rules prevented small breweries from getting off the ground. Since the AGLC relaxed its laws, opening up the door for anyone to open a brewery if they want to, we’ve seen a steady flow of microbreweries doing what they do best. I love that so many home brew fanatics now have the opportunity to turn their passions into small businesses that bolster our local growers at the same time. There’s a new brewery tour that will take you and a group of potential new BFFs to a handful of the newest, even the smallest micro and nanobreweries around the city, traveling by cushy bus and even stopping for lunch along the way. Calgary Brewery Tours is the first of its kind in Calgary, a sort of grown-up crawl that’s fun and educational. At each stop, you get to meet the people behindContinue reading

1
Share

I decided this past weekend to bring back the Sunday supper – to get back into the habit of gathering people I want to spend more time with around the table each Sunday to reconnect. (I never regret spending time eating and visiting with people I love, but often regret not doing so more often.) I want it to become a part of our week. Conveniently, I almost always spend a chunk of my Sundays puttering around the kitchen anyway. But. This may surprise you – there are some weekends, after a week of cooking and shooting and doing dishes and repeating it all, that I want to go out. Besides, we have some great restaurants in this city that I want to support – especially at a time when everyone seems to be struggling – and a bunch of them offer fixed menu Sunday suppers, served family-style to help facilitate the social aspect of that traditional weekend meal. I love this – it’s likeContinue reading

0
Share

Apologies for the radio silence – it’s been a crazy month, and I didn’t want to draw too much attention to this new space, to fully invite you in to poke around and give the grand tour, until everything in it was cleaned up and functional. (Hello, Christmas holiday project.) But honestly, it would be more like me to just sweep everything into the corners and open more wine in the hopes that no one will notice. I’m also learning a slightly new dashboard while I go – and thought I’d start with a recipe-free post, before I learn my new plugin (that also enabled new search functionality – my priority!), and so I thought I’d tell you a little about Banff, if you aren’t already familiar with it, or even if you are. It’s one of my happy places – I’ve been driving the hour or so there since I was a kid, crammed into the rear of one of those backwards-facing navy blueContinue reading

1
Share

I’ve spent a lot of time in Edmonton this year – more so than usual – and because of this happy coincidence I’ve had the chance to eat my way around the city, which is a Very Good Thing. For a long time, Edmonton was known as the chain restaurant capital of Canada. This isn’t the case anymore – Edmonton is a city of great restaurants and farmers’ markets and local producers and coffee shops, and an impressive slowfood convivium. Some of my very favourite food people are doing their thing there, and I feel the need to share some of the things they make and do, in case you find yourself in Edmonton. I wish I could just tug on the highway and pull the whole city closer. (Below are chefs Blair Lebsak of Rge Rd, Ryan O’Flynn of the Edmonton Westin, and Brad Haffner of The Local Omnivore, plating dishes for the A Seat at Our Table long table dinner about a monthContinue reading

14
Share

For all my whingeing about the end of summer, I adore fall – it’s my favourite time of year. I look for any excuse to hit the highway – in any direction, but I particularly love heading southwest of the city, along the Cowboy Trail, to Priddis and Millarville, Black Diamond and Turner Valley. A couple weekends ago, we helped with a barley harvest out at Bar U Ranch, a preserved working ranch and the only National Historic Site to commemorate the history of ranching in Canada. The Bar U was one of the first large scale cattle ranching operations in Canada, at one time ranging 30,000 head of cattle on 160,000 acres of grassland, and held a stock of 1,000 purebred Percherons. To sum its legacy from the Friends of the Bar U Ranch website: The ranch fed workers building the first transcontinental railway and waves of immigrants, Canada’s first Indian reservations, the first patrols of Northwest Mounted Police, our nation through the GreatContinue reading

0
Share

Most summers, we’re out in Tofino when the Calgary Folk Music Festival takes over Prince’s Island in the heart of Calgary. The festival is legendary, drawing musicians from around the world and inspiring Calgarians to stick around and plan their holidays around FolkFest weekend. From the time it first showed up on my radar, I knew it for the food – the curries and Joy’s ginger beer, in the early years. This year is the 36th annual, and they’ve outdone themselves – besides the 76 bands from 16 countries on 8 stages playing concerts and holding workshops and collaborative sessions, there are some seriously fantastic local eats. (And drinks, of course – you’ll find Big Rock in the ultra-popular beer garden.) People know it for the running of the tarps – I go for the eating of the food. I work up an appetite walking or biking down, and then navigate the food lineups. If you go early, they’re not bad – but even onceContinue reading

0
Share