I’m not sure where August went, but apparently school is back in. Suddenly it’s dark at 8 o’clock, and I’ve put on my wooly socks and hoodie – although I’m strongly resisting turning the furnace back on. And so we’re shifting gears back to rushed mornings, packed lunches and dinner at a more regular hour than it has been over the summer. But because W turned 13 in August (!!) and is now as tall as me, he’s hungry all the time! Fortunately he can cook, but isn’t always inclined to do so. He can turn out a decent omelet and over-easy egg – his go-to meals or snacks when he wants to cook something himself, but as part of the year-long video series I’ve been doing with the EggcentricTV and the Egg Farmers of Canada, we decided to make frittatas in a jar, in part as a way to deal with the leftovers that always seem to be taking up space in the fridge.Continue reading

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Crêpes are, truly, one of my favourite things to eat – and to me they taste like summer, perhaps because we always make them on mornings when everyone is around and on holiday, or perhaps because they’re best with berries and other seasonal fruit. (Honestly, my favourite way to eat a crêpe is still to spread it with butter, sprinkle with brown sugar and cinnamon, add a squeeze of lemon if there’s one around, roll it up and eat it standing at the stove while I make more crêpes.) This year I’m doing a series with the Egg Farmers of Canada, making video tutorials that suit the seasons, and this is what I chose for the summer. Crêpes are a fun thing to get the kids into making too – once you have the method down pat, it’s a skill you’ll keep forever. And you make plenty of friends and admirers when you know how to make a batch of crêpes.

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Hey, who loves cheese puffs? I’ve partnered up again with the Egg Farmers of Canada to make a video tutorial on how to make cheesy, eggy gougères for their EggcentricTV app, as part of their new spring recipe collection. Gougères are light, airy puffs traditionally made with gruyère, but I find aged Gouda a pretty amazing alternate. Gougères are fantastic for spring get-togethers – they’re great for nibbling any time of the year, particularly when there’s wine involved, but seem particularly well-suited to spring gatherings, and just as fitting for brunch as cocktails on the patio, if you’re lucky enough to be rid of the snow. If not, mix up a batch of these, open a bottle of wine and hunker down.

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So hey, who loves a Dutch baby? I’ve partnered with EggcentricTV and the folks at Egg Farmers of Canada to make a video tutorial on how to make one, taking took over my parents’ (brand new!) kitchen to talk about one of our favourite sharable recipes for their #RecipesThatGive campaign in support of Food Banks Canada. Feeding people is important to me, particularly at this time of year when we all love to gather around food, and yet so many members of our community are feeling the pinch. I chose a Dutch baby – a puffed pancake you bake in the oven, and one of my favourite things to make year-round but especially during the holidays, when I like a little added drama but minimal work. It’s fast and affordable – whisk together three eggs, half a cup of milk and another of flour and bake in a preheated pan in a hot oven and voilà – it’s like an enormous Yorkshire pudding you canContinue reading

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A few weekends ago the family gathered for brunch, and my brother in law brought a quiche. It wasn’t a frittata, but it didn’t have a pastry crust either – its base was made of hash browns. Brilliance! Eggs and veggies and cheese nested in grated potato, baked and served in wedges. His was asparagus and goat cheese and we devoured it all, and then I went home and made one, just to see. So simple! You grate a potato or two on the coarse side of a box grater, then get it started in a hot skillet, crisping up the bottom, before filling it and sliding it into the oven. You work in a little extra in the way of vegetables, but it’s still starchy – and perfect for people who can’t have pastry. Genius.

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I realize it’s Monday morning and you’ve likely started the day with something practical, like steel-cut oats, having got all the bacon and whatnot out of your system over the weekend. But we all dream of sleeping in and lounging over brunch, right? It helps to have that golden beacon shining from the end of the week. I seem to be in Easter mode early this year – perhaps because it hasn’t snowed since the day W received his much-coveted snow tube in the mail sometime mid-January (it still sits sadly in the front hall, unused) – and maybe because Easter arrives so early. Two weeks! Easter or not, the warm and suddenly longer days jolt me into brunch mode – and although most weekend mornings I like to spend extra time in the kitchen baking something to nibble with coffee, this past weekend there were more crammed around our little table in the kitchen (even though I (finally!) managed to clear some surface areaContinue reading

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I fear this blog is becoming my excuse for making carb-heavy weekend breakfasts on a weekly basis. This time, though, my excuse was a quickly hardening crusty loaf that took up altogether too much real estate on the countertop, and there wasn’t even room for a bun in the freezer. My neighbour had been chatting her overnight French toast up on Facebook, and thus the seed was planted. (Aside: I also appear to be stockpiling frozen blueberries, for all those smoothies I haven’t been making lately.) I baked this the day before we left for Seattle, and brought a bowl of leftovers cold with us when we left the house before dawn, eating it in the car in the Tim Horton’s drive-thru in lieu of take-out. Essentially this is less-sweet bread pudding; the fact that the bread is torn or cut into chunks before soaking in an eggy bath classifies it as such. Not that it matters. What’s in a name? If you want itContinue reading

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I eat lunch at my desk a lot. The commute from my kitchen may seem perfectly suited to lunching on big quinoa salads (always my plan, rarely reality) and freshly cooked this or that. Mostly I wind up eating toast. It’s really an enjoyable spot to eat – with Twitter on and this view out the window, it’s almost like being on a park bench. Kinda. Except for all the papers. Eggs are popular, with the aforementioned toast or quickly sautéed greens or draped over leftovers. I ran out of gumption to poach eggs sometime about two weeks ago, and one day decided to bake some instead. I didn’t want to coddle them. You know, that wouldn’t do them any favours. I cracked two into a ramekin, poured over a spoonful of half & half, salted, peppered, and sprinkled with Parmesan. Baked at 350F for 15 minutes. (This is how the first few went: at 10 far from done; 20 cooked hard, but delicious withContinue reading

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Wait – don’t go. Hear me out. Last week I made a resolution to use the food I have in my kitchen, rather than go shop for more, deciding what’s for dinner depending on my mood or the (near-constant) desire to try something new. I go for milk and eggs and come home with bags full of whatever was inspiring or on sale at the time, and then can hardly cram it into my cupboards and freezer. I think this is pretty typical, considering the fact that walk-in pantries and chest freezers are standard issue in most houses. I hear a lot of people refer fondly to their fridges as that place produce goes to die. And it’s true – in North America (Canada very much included) it’s estimated that we throw out 40-50% of the food we buy. Half! Can you imagine the spending on groceries that takes place across the country on a daily basis? And that half of those purchases are tossedContinue reading

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