lamb cassoulet 3
,

I know, it’s not much to look at. And with everything (finally!) turning green, I imagine you’re in the mood for something a little more fresh-from-the-ground. But if I wait until it gets really hot no one will want to turn the oven on, and if I set this aside for the fall, I’ll forget. And I don’t want to forget this. It’s dark and rich and sticky and intense… and lengthier than my usual, I realize – but far shorter than the average cassoulet. You won’t have to wrangle an entire duck or roast a whole pig or cook three separate dishes, then combine them in an 18 quart pot and bake them together for seventeen hours to get where you’re going.

0
Share
, ,

I know I make a lot of pizza around here, but you’ll want to bookmark this one, I’m told. We first had it about a month ago; it was a means of using up the last of the crispily cooked ground lamb I had used in a cassoulet on a night when we had just a tiny sliver of time between work and a school play. I rummaged around the fridge, using up bits of soft Boursin and goat cheese, and cooked up a bunch of kale. My sister took a bite and declared it the best thing she had ever eaten. I thought it was the tiredness talking – that eating it standing up in the kitchen as the boys got their coats and boots on to leave the house again somehow made it taste better. But I think it was really just that good. The other day, my sister took a bite of something and said -again- that it was the best thingContinue reading

0
Share
,

One of the most popular search terms people use to get here is “leg of lamb slow cooker”. Apparently I posted about it sometime back in 2008, and there are a great many people who want to know how to cook leg of lamb in the slow cooker. I’m glad to know this – there are few better – or simpler – meals than a melt-in-your-mouth leg of lamb, slow cooked while you go about your day.

24
Share
,

I know, lamb chops cost about as much as platinum. But they taste a whole lot better. If you’ve ever been to – or heard of – Vij’s in Vancouver, you’ll know that these lamb popsicles must be pretty sublime, being their signature dish and all. A lamb popsicle is a Frenched chop – take a rack of lamb and cut between each bone and you have wee chops on the end of long, elegant bones – perfect finger food. And if you sort of scrape the meat down the bone, nudging it all toward one end, you have a neater lamb popsicle, which you can then cook quickly on the grill or in a hot skillet. And then there’s the option to serve them with this fenugreek cream for dipping/slurping – it doesn’t get much better.

1
Share
,

Ta da! (Honestly – I didn’t even arrange the rosemary in this photo – it just came out that way.) I’m really – for sure this time – bringing back Sunday Dinner. I don’t mean that in the sense of reintroducing it to the world – I know this is something people commonly do – and yes, we’ve been eating dinner on Sunday nights for quite some time, but the tradition of bringing the extended family around the table for something that might even require actual napkins (as opposed to the omnipresent roll of paper towels) is something we’ve fallen out of the habit of. Not that it ever was a big thing in the childhood of my memory – throughout our twenties and most of our thirties we’d go to Mike’s parents house for Old Shoe Cooked in Beer, which we’ll just say didn’t foster the grandest memories. I’ve always wondered what it might have been like to marry into a big, food-loving ItalianContinue reading

10
Share
,

Really, we have to stop meeting like this. I was a very bad omnivore today. Breakfast was a cheesecake brownie (on the upside, it was from Brûlée) eaten with great guilt on the sidewalk in front of the gym I used to actually go to while waiting to cross the street. Honestly, why can so many calories be ingested in so little time? Then Mike brought me an ice cap, and later, fueled by panic and adrenaline over a looming deadline, I ate three chocolate chip cookies all warm and gooey from the oven. (They were for an event. Quality control is very important.) Dinner was a Moroccan meal, the theme chosen by the highest bidders on me at an event to raise money for Brown Bagging for Calgary Kids. (Yes, I was auctioned off – tonight we coined the term “charity whore”.) I couldn’t have been sold to nicer people – they had nice friends, even, and made nice pomegranate martinis. I made aContinue reading

0
Share
,

Tomorrow night, I get to play chef at an outdoor barbecue in Glenmore Park. In preparation, one of the hosts dropped off some lamb for me to prepare. Some beautiful 4H lamb. Thirty-eight pounds of lamb. An entire lamb, more or less. Minus the identifiable bits. It’s all cubed for kebabs, but since there will only be 20 in attendance there’s a little surplus here to play with. I thought I’d grind some up in the food processor and make lamb meatballs as a starter. Rather than do my usual feta-oregano-currants-mint medley, the bottle of tandoori spice mix I just picked up (from a friend who just started his own spice company) caught my eye, and I shook a good dose of that over the meat instead, with a few cloves of garlic and a glug of olive oil, and then pulsed it to grind the lot. And so just to make sure it was edible, since it is technically for company, I shaped someContinue reading

0
Share
,

Remember that lamb I did in the slow cooker? I put the last chunk in a yogurt container and poured all the lovely juices over top, and stuck it in the fridge. (Among a literal forest of yogurt containers filled with leftover lentils and sourdough starter.) It gelled, as meaty juices do, with all the fat evenly hardened on the surface. I plucked it off, chopped the meat and squished the lot into a small baking dish, then sprinkled it with frozen peas (they’ll cook when I bake the pie). This all occurred yesterday, as I was making the lentil-sweet potato thing; while I was at it I boiled up some surplus diced sweet potato, mashed it and spread it over the meat and peas. It felt a little evil-genius, only in a good way. Two dinners in one go. So tonight all that needed to be done was to pop it in the oven to warm through. I have to admit, it was aContinue reading

0
Share

Stay with me here – I realize the photo is not going to sell you on this one. It is the result of artificial light, a camera about to die, and lamb sausages braised in red wine until they resembled, well, I don’t want to disgust you further. I had read a traditional recipe for Saucisses aux Lentilles du Puy (Sausages with French Green Lentils) in my winter issue of Saveur, and thought it might translate well to lamb sausage and red wine. Aesthetics aside, it was quite delicious. Next time I might add garlic to the pot, or simmer the lentils in stock in place of the water. Or lacking wine (which, to be honest, I couldn’t much taste), brown the sausages and then tuck them into the simmering lentils to finish cooking.

0
Share