Holiday Preserves on Brie 2
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THIS. Baked brie with Christmas preserves: it’s what’s for dinner. And breakfast, probably. I’ve embraced this season of chocolates, cookies and leftover party food as in place of our regular meals, or at least as supplements. I’m pretty sure I’ve eaten more baked brie in the last few weeks as I have all year – and I’m counting on more tonight. About twenty years ago, I was in my early twenties visiting a friend in Saskatoon – she lived in a corner bungalow that back then cost so little these days I could probably put it on my credit card – and she had two small kids, a work and soccer schedule, and the whole scenario seemed so grown-up, especially when we decided one day to make a big pot of preserves to divvy into jars and hand out as Christmas gifts. We came up with this mishmash of holiday flavours – citrus, cranberries, nuts and spice – and made a special run to theContinue reading

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cheesecake 3
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Today it’s going to be short and sweet. (Literally.) I forgot to tell you about this cheesecake. One day while I was out in Jasper, I snuck samples of Anna Olson‘s classic New York cheesecake out of her CIN session to take a few photos outside – warding off the chipmunks – and then spread eagled on my perfectly made (ironed, even) sheets and ate both – with a magazine and a latte. I always learn something from Anna and Michael – this year I managed to sit in on only a bit of their session, but learned that if you put the base of your springform pan in upside down, you get rid of that lip that makes it almost impossible to cleanly slide a cake server or knife under your slice of cheesecake to get it out. Smart lady, she is. And she always has great hair. (I do not. I try.) Of course being the queen of everything sweet, she makes aContinue reading

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Antipasto 2
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This is a rerun from Day 16 of this blog. Day 16! I can hardly remember it being a demanding newborn. But really, this is a recipe I’ve been making since I was about 16, and before that my mom made it, and my grandma, and great aunts, and regular aunts, and I’m pretty sure it was/is in the Art Gallery of Windsor Cookbook, circa 1970something. (My relatives on that side were/are from Windsor, and so a handful of our family recipes can be found in or came from that book.) Everyone has a few things that taste like Christmas to them – or Hannukah, or Festivus – and this is one of those edibles that can’t not be made in December. It’s so ingrained in our holiday psyches that I can’t really tell if it’s something I’d eat or not if I was introduced to it now (the ingredient list may make me shudder), but every year we make an enormous potful.

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Vanilla Collage

It’s getting to be that time, you guys! Party season! Baking season! The time of year when it’s a good idea to have a stash of something delicious and homemade to bring along to parties and get-togethers and to give to people who are an important part of your life. I made a batch of vanilla earlier this year, but the time is right to get a batch started now – whether it’s for your own personal use or to bottle and give as gifts. Fresh vanilla beans + vodka (or bourbon) = pure vanilla extract. So easy. One of you gave me a bag of fresh vanilla beans a year or so ago – last time we had a potluck (we need to do that again soon, don’t you think?) – and as I always do with vanilla beans, I tuck them away in the back of the cupboard to save for something special, then inevitably recover them when I’m back there digging forContinue reading

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I’m in Jasper all this week, doing cooking demos at Christmas in November – this year, the theme is Alice Eats, so we’re talking tea parties. This recipe isn’t in the book, but marmalade is an essential component of a true high tea (or is it strawberry jam?) – I love tart marmalade in the winter, and it reminds me of my grandma, who made great scones and served them with Robertson’s Thick Cut. I know rhubarb is associated with spring, being the first out of the ground when it thaws, but this year it was the last one standing in my garden, and I managed to harvest a bunch from back by the garage and pilfered my mom’s plant too before it decided to dump with snow, so a good part of my freezer is taken up by chopped stalks.

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Bread & Butter Pickles 1

I admit I fell in love with bread & butter pickles because of their name; had they been labeled “thin and floppy sliced pickles” I might not have been as drawn to them. The reference to bread and butter made me curious – did they go with bread and butter? Are they as mellow as bread and butter? I tried eating them atop bread and butter once, treating them like slices of jam. Mostly I loved them for their tangy sweetness; as a kid, I’d stick a fork in the jar and impale several layers, then steal a sip of the brine as a chaser. Pickle brine is perhaps the most underutilized ingredient out there – once the pickles are gone, the brine can be turned into vinaigrette, and I just recently learned that Earls adds a splash of pickle brine to their Caesars, which is perhaps why they are the very best ever. Those who make their own pickles tend to default to dillContinue reading

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Garlic Onion Jam 1
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I can. not. stop. eating stacks of crackers with aged white cheddar and spoonfuls of roasted garlic jam. Would you? Could you? Especially when there’s a stack and a jar beside your laptop and you’re tangled in a blanket, unable to run away from its sweet-sour-tangy-salty-garlicky charms? When it’s made almost entirely of vegetables, jam totally counts as dinner, right? If garlic had a season, it would be now. I love the purple-skinned, sticky and intense local garlic that can be found this time of year – nothing like the dry, papery stuff that comes from China. The fall is the best time to plant it, too – take a few cloves from a great head of garlic and poke them into the ground. That green sprout that emerges from a clove if you’ve left it too long in the cupboard is the plant starting to grow. Next spring you’ll have garlic scapes, and if you time things right, a supply of beautiful garlic throughoutContinue reading

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bacon tomato jam 3
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Just when I think I’ve tried everything (not really, but some days are more uninspiring than others) something comes along that is so much better than the sum of its familiar parts. Had I flipped past a recipe for bacon and tomato jam I would have certainly done a double take, but I’m not sure this would have jumped off the page and grabbed me – but when Shauna came to visit in Tofino and brought a copy of their latest book, she looked me straight in the eye as she handed it to me and said, “try the bacon and tomato jam.” It seemed at first as if she was speaking in code, like I was meant to read more into her message. I wasn’t. She just meant to make it clear that I should make the damn jam. And so I did. This is not jam in the typical sense of the word – it’s sweet on account of the roasted tomatoes andContinue reading

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Sriracha Ketchup 1

Have you ever read Malcolm Gladwell’s The Tipping Point? In it he addresses the ketchup conundrum – the fact that mustards have evolved over the years, and yet no food company seems able to touch Heinz ketchup, which manages to satisfy all five of our senses of taste – “it began at the tip of the tongue, where our receptors for sweet and salty first appear, moved along the sides, where sour notes seem the strongest, then hit the back of the tongue, for umami and bitter, in one long crescendo.” I still love ketchup – on hot dogs and eggs and mac & cheese and grilled cheese. And while I love the idea of homemade ketchup, it’s never quite the same as the stuff in the bottle. Which isn’t to say it’s not delicious, it’s just not the same thing – when it’s homemade, I know to expect something like a pureed sweet-sour tomato chutney. This year I’ve been on a bit of aContinue reading

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