Crabapple Jelly

Crabapple Jelly

AuthorJulie

apples
currants, cranberries or plums, if you like
sugar

1

Wash, stem and halve or quarter the apples into a large pot. (Don’t bother to peel or core them.) Add a few handfuls of black currants or cranberries or a few pitted and quartered plums, if you like. Add enough water to just cover them and bring to a boil and simmer for 20-30 minutes, until the apples are very soft.

2

Pour into a strainer or colander lined with cheesecloth (or use a jelly bag if you have one) set over a large bowl or pot, and let the juice drain out. Stir the pulp around a bit if you want to hurry it up - but any poking or prodding will result in a cloudy jelly. I don't mind this, but you might. That's cool.

3

Measure the resulting juice into a pot (this is easy if you drain it into a pot with measurements marked on the side) and add 3/4 cup sugar for every cup of juice. Bring to a boil over high heat and boil rapidly, stirring often, until the mixture reaches 220°F on a candy thermometer, or until a small amount placed on a cold plate and put into the freezer wrinkles when you poke at it with your finger. This should take about 20 minutes.

4

While it’s still hot, pour the jelly into clean, hot jars, skim off any foam that rises to the top with a spoon, and seal with lids. Set aside to cool. (I find that if I use hot jelly and hot jars, straight from the dishwasher, they seal properly and I can store them for a long time, but this is not proper advice - so feel free to follow proper canning instructions.)

Category

Ingredients

 apples
 currants, cranberries or plums, if you like
 sugar

Directions

1

Wash, stem and halve or quarter the apples into a large pot. (Don’t bother to peel or core them.) Add a few handfuls of black currants or cranberries or a few pitted and quartered plums, if you like. Add enough water to just cover them and bring to a boil and simmer for 20-30 minutes, until the apples are very soft.

2

Pour into a strainer or colander lined with cheesecloth (or use a jelly bag if you have one) set over a large bowl or pot, and let the juice drain out. Stir the pulp around a bit if you want to hurry it up - but any poking or prodding will result in a cloudy jelly. I don't mind this, but you might. That's cool.

3

Measure the resulting juice into a pot (this is easy if you drain it into a pot with measurements marked on the side) and add 3/4 cup sugar for every cup of juice. Bring to a boil over high heat and boil rapidly, stirring often, until the mixture reaches 220°F on a candy thermometer, or until a small amount placed on a cold plate and put into the freezer wrinkles when you poke at it with your finger. This should take about 20 minutes.

4

While it’s still hot, pour the jelly into clean, hot jars, skim off any foam that rises to the top with a spoon, and seal with lids. Set aside to cool. (I find that if I use hot jelly and hot jars, straight from the dishwasher, they seal properly and I can store them for a long time, but this is not proper advice - so feel free to follow proper canning instructions.)

Crabapple Jelly
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