Mandarin Orange Bundt Cake

I think we all need a little more cake these days.

Blending whole oranges into a thick puree to add to cake and muffin batter isn’t new – I have a recipe for a whole orange cake on an old recipe card I’ve had since childhood (yes, I was a kid who wrote and collected recipe cards) and the Sunshine Muffins in the Best of Bridge are made with whole oranges whizzed with everything else in a blender. Food 52 has a recipe for a whole orange bundt from Sunset Magazine in their book, Genius Desserts. W made it awhile ago, and it occurred to me that such a cake would make perfect use of those inevitable squidgy mandarin oranges I always seem to wind up with, whether I buy them by the box or bag. (We talked about other things to do with mandarins on this week’s Eyeopener!)


The great thing about all mandarin oranges – which includes Clementines, tangerines and satsumas – besides the fact that they taste amazing and are easy to peel – is that they don’t have a lot of white pith, so are perfect for blending whole to mix into things. I quartered 5 or 6 (I had some small ones, but they were intensely flavoured!) for this cake (about a pound) – you’ll need about 1 1/2 cups of chunky puree. You’ll need an average or slightly smaller bundt pan, and make sure you spray it well with nonstick spray – or you could bake this batter as cupcakes/muffins instead – fill paper-lined muffin tins and bake for 20-25 minutes. If you love the combination of chocolate and orange, try stirring in 1/2-1 cup chopped dark chocolate – the batter is nice and thick, so it shouldn’t sink to the bottom. (I’m trying this next!)

Mandarin Orange Bundt Cake

AuthorJulie

Yields16 Servings

1/2 cup butter, softened
1/2 cup canola or other mild vegetable oil
1 1/4 cups sugar
3 large eggs
1-2 tsp vanilla
5 mandarin oranges, washed (about 1 lb)
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
Glaze:
1 — 1 1/2 cups icing sugar
1 Tbsp butter, melted
1 Tbsp mandarin orange juice, cream or milk

1

Preheat the oven to 350F and spray a Bundt pan very well with nonstick spray.

2

In a large bowl with an electric mixer on medium speed, beat the butter, oil and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs one by one, along with the vanilla.

3

Wash and quarter the mandarin oranges and pulse in a food processor until mostly puréed — it will still be chunky, and that’s a good thing. In a bowl, stir together the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt.

4

Add half the dry ingredients to the butter mixture, beating on low or stirring just until combined, then add about 1 1/2 cups of the orange pulp (don’t worry if it’s a bit more or less), then the remaining dry ingredients. Scrape into the bundt pan and bake for 45-55 minutes, until deep golden and springy to the touch. (If you like, stick a bamboo skewer in — it should come out without crumbs sticking to it.)

5

Let cool for about 20 minutes, then turn out onto a plate or wire rack while still warm. Whisk together 1 cup of the icing sugar, melted butter and mandarin juice (or milk/cream) until you have a drizzling consistency — add a bit more sugar if it’s too thin. Drizzle over the warm or cooled cake. Serves 16.

Category

Ingredients

 1/2 cup butter, softened
 1/2 cup canola or other mild vegetable oil
 1 1/4 cups sugar
 3 large eggs
 1-2 tsp vanilla
 5 mandarin oranges, washed (about 1 lb)
 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
 2 tsp baking powder
 1/4 tsp baking soda
 1/2 tsp salt
Glaze:
 1 — 1 1/2 cups icing sugar
 1 Tbsp butter, melted
 1 Tbsp mandarin orange juice, cream or milk

Directions

1

Preheat the oven to 350F and spray a Bundt pan very well with nonstick spray.

2

In a large bowl with an electric mixer on medium speed, beat the butter, oil and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs one by one, along with the vanilla.

3

Wash and quarter the mandarin oranges and pulse in a food processor until mostly puréed — it will still be chunky, and that’s a good thing. In a bowl, stir together the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt.

4

Add half the dry ingredients to the butter mixture, beating on low or stirring just until combined, then add about 1 1/2 cups of the orange pulp (don’t worry if it’s a bit more or less), then the remaining dry ingredients. Scrape into the bundt pan and bake for 45-55 minutes, until deep golden and springy to the touch. (If you like, stick a bamboo skewer in — it should come out without crumbs sticking to it.)

5

Let cool for about 20 minutes, then turn out onto a plate or wire rack while still warm. Whisk together 1 cup of the icing sugar, melted butter and mandarin juice (or milk/cream) until you have a drizzling consistency — add a bit more sugar if it’s too thin. Drizzle over the warm or cooled cake. Serves 16.

Mandarin Orange Bundt Cake
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10 comments on “Mandarin Orange Bundt Cake

  1. Anita
    November 16, 2021 at 8:49 pm

    Yes I do need more cake in my life. Thanks for reading my mind and posting this recipe. Yum!

  2. Carolee Ritchings
    November 17, 2021 at 12:58 pm

    Can the canned mandarin oranges be used in this recipe

  3. Keva
    November 17, 2021 at 4:26 pm

    Can drained canned mandarins be used?

    • Julie
      November 19, 2021 at 9:20 am

      I think they’d be too liquidy, and wouldn’t have the same flavour punch as whole mandarins with their peel…

      • Julie
        November 19, 2021 at 9:20 am

        But would probably ultimately work! the cake would have a different texture though!

  4. Carol S-B
    November 17, 2021 at 6:22 pm

    Oh wow, this looks (and sounds) amazing!

  5. Karin Baumgardner
    November 18, 2021 at 10:17 pm

    Looks strikingly similar to Edna Staebler’s Date and Orange Muffins from way back in the 70’s! Must try this version. May have to add the dates though. 😉

    • Julie
      November 19, 2021 at 9:19 am

      Ha, I don’t know that one! but yes there were a ton of blended orange muffins, loaves and cakes in that era!

  6. Karen
    November 28, 2021 at 7:01 am

    Are the peels left on?

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